Month: March 2019

Best Wood For your Stove!

Ever wondered what the best wood for your stove is? Sit back as we’re about to find out!

As the majority of people use seasoned logs, kiln-dried logs or free wood from their garden/ local area or friends. Here are some things you need to know about using wood on your stove.

Unlike coal and smokeless fuels wood is the most environmentally friendly choice for your stove as it is carbon neutral. It will take in more carbon dioxide in its lifetime than it will take to burn.

To make burning wood more efficient the moisture content should be as 20% or less as the energy won’t be wasted having to burn off the water first.

Wood fuel and moisture content
  • Free wood that has been collected could have as much as 90% moisture in it
  • Seasoned logs – ones that you or the manufacturer have partially dried out contain around 25% to 40% moisture.
  • Kiln-dried logs, which are dried out in a kiln before being sold, contain less than 20% moisture.
  • Briquettes – fuel created from crushing recycled wood or paper – have a low moisture content. It can be as little as 10% or less

Look out for the ready to burn logo as this means the wood contains less than 20% moisture and only wood from reputable manufacturers can display this logo.

Multi-fuel stoves can burn coal and wood. But not all multi-fuel stoves burn wood as efficiently as a log burner would. This is because, to burn at its best, wood needs to sit on a bed of ash (or with Firemizer) with air coming from above.

Hardwood or softwood?

Hardwoods are any broad-leafed tree such as beech, elm, and ash. whereas Softwoods are conifers, for instance, cedar and fir.

Hardwoods are better for burning in your stove as it burns slower and softwoods burn twice as fast as the density is half that of hardwood, meaning you’ll need twice as much. However, softwood makes the better kindling for your fire.

Best woods for your stove!

Oak – This is the nicest firewood although it takes longer to dry it burns slowly and generates a lot of heat. It can be difficult to light however using Firebuilder can help you there!

Birch – This wood ignites quickly and generates lots of heat however you’ll use much more fuel but you can mix with other logs to slow the burn time or use Firemizer, that can reduce your fuel consumption by 38%

Maple –  Is a slower burn than oak and the fire won’t as hot as the types of wood above but it is a good choice for firewood.

Choosing the right wood for your fire means you can stay toasty in the colder months and enjoy a relaxing fire!

How do I light a Fire Without Matches?

These days it’s easy to get fire but how would you light one without matches, you may need to know how one day!

Using flint to start a fire has it’s advantages as it doesn’t matter if it gets wet as it won’t be ruined. 

fire, axe and matches What you’ll need!

Flint

A pocket knife [if your flint doesn’t have a scraping tool]

Kindling [ paper, cardboard, dry grass and small twigs] all work well

Sticks and larger logs once the fire gets going

Prepare the tinder nest

You want a nest of dry tinder the tiniest spark can be used to create flames. Use a knife to scrape thin wood shavings or alternatively gather dried grass, leaves or bark for a loose nest.

If you use dry grass you want to make a little bed for the flint shavings to go on. Put the bed on some smaller twigs and have other pieces ready to put on the fire.

Get in the zone

Take the flint and pocket knife, scrape some of the flints off one side, if you see sparks flip it over as you’re using the wrong side. You want to create some small flint shavings to go onto the bed of dry grass. A pile the size of a 5p is all you’ll need but you can add more if necessary. 

Relight the fire!

This time you’ll need to use the other side of the flint to create a spark. Hold it down next the bed at an angle so sparks will fall onto it. Take the scraper or pocket knife and scrape down the flint towards the bed. You should start to see sparks and if they don’t catch just keep scraping. Once you have a small flame going start to add some smaller twigs and continue to feed the fire. Don’t add too much too fast. The fire might go out!

Having problems

Is your kindling dry enough?

Is there’s too much wind getting to the embers?

Do you have enough flint shavings

If the fire starts but doesn’t keep going start blowing gently on the glowing pieces. 

Firebuilder can help your fires get going, a kindling and fire starter in one! No odour,  mess or chemicals!

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